MINIMUM WAGE INCREASES

Effective July 1, 2017, the minimum wage has increased to $12 per hour for employers with 26 or more employees in the City of Los Angeles, unincorporated parts of Los Angeles County, Malibu, Pasadena, and Santa Monica.  For more information regarding compliance with minimum wage laws, please contact our office.

CALIFORNIA TRIES TO CLEAN UP SICK LEAVE LAW

In an effort to clean up California’s new sick leave law, the California Legislature passed AB 304, which was then signed by the Governor.  Among other things, the new law expands acceptable methods of sick leave accrual, and eases calculation of sick leave pay for employees with different rates of pay.  The new law takes effect immediately.

For more information about the impact of the new law or the amendment, please contact us at 562-901-2500 or e-mail us at info@KriegerLaw.com.

COURT REJECTS OUT OF STATE FORUM SELECTION CLAUSE

In the case of Verdugo v. Alliantgroup, L.P., decided on May 28, 2015, the Court in the Fourth Appellate District addressed the validity of a forum selection clause selecting a county in Texas as the exclusive forum for resolution of disputes regarding an employment contract. Specifically, the Court addressed whether such a clause was valid for disputes regarding California wage claims.

The Court ruled that California’s public policy precluded enforcement of such a clause for claims arising under the California Labor Code. However, the Court did not address application of its ruling to other California statutes, leaving such questions for future litigation and decisions in the Fourth Appellate District and in other courts.

For more information about the application of this case and its impact, please contact us at 562-901-2500 or e-mail us at info@KriegerLaw.com.

COURT RULES THAT EMPLOYER’S MISTAKEN BELIEF OF EMPLOYEE REPORT TO GOVERNMENTAL AGENCY STILL PROVIDES WHISTLE-BLOWER PROTECTIONS

On November 21, 2014, in the case of Diego v. Pilgrim United Church of Christ, a California Appellate Court ruled that an employee is entitled to whistle-blower protections, even if the employer falsely suspected that the employee disclosed a violation of law to a governmental agency. The court ruled that the employer may not retaliate against the employee even if the employee did not, in fact, report such a violation.

For more information about the impact of these requirements, please contact us at 562-901-2500 or e-mail us at info@KriegerLaw.com.